How to Create a Kickstarter Video that Yields Results

Whether you’re trying to raise money to start a new business or are fundraising for a philanthropic cause, a Kickstarter video is going to be your primary tool in convincing potential donors to support your efforts. The beauty of crowdfunding is that it allows independent artists and entrepreneurs the opportunity to grow their dreams while building an audience. But creating a video to convince people to support your efforts can be a major challenge. So how can you make a Kickstarter video that helps you reach your fundraising goals?

Invest in a professional quality video.

Many entrepreneurs, nonprofits, bands, and artists underestimate the importance of a professional quality video. The reality is that decent lighting, clean audio, and attention to details are crucial to advocate asking for help. After all, no one wants to donate money to an organization or effort that looks haphazard or even sketchy. Now, we’re not saying that you need a full-blown Hollywood production for your Kickstarter video, but you can’t afford to frustrate the viewer with a poor video.

The larger the project and the more you’re trying to raise, then the more important the quality of the video becomes. Working with video and production professionals ensures that the content, look, and feel of the video are appropriate for your fundraising efforts.

Cover the basics of your project.

Some of the most important parts of your video won’t be in the filmography itself, but rather in the script. According to Kickstarter itself, the major components that should be covered in any video include:

  • Explaining who you are
  • Telling the story behind your project
  • Asking for support, why you need it, and how donations will benefit the project
  • Emphasize that if the goal isn’t reached, you’ll get nothing from the pledges
  • Thank everyone for their time

By covering these elements in your video, you can ensure that your video is primed to successfully encourage viewers to make a donation.

 

Discuss rewards for donations. 

One of the most important elements of a Kickstarter video is creating rewards for those that donate to your cause. You cannot undervalue these creative, tangible, and worthwhile rewards as you try to garner support for your project. Once you’ve determined what kind of reward you want to give to donors, be sure to explain it in the video as well as on your other social media platforms.

The most common rewards include, but are not limited to:

  1. Copies. If you’re trying to fundraise for a feature length film, music video, or some other visual or artistic project, offer free copies to those who donate.
  2. Collaborations. If people donate a certain amount, they can have a creative collaboration in your project, mission, or business.
  3. Memorabilia. Regardless of the project, it’s easy to create memorabilia such as t-shirts, bracelets, or bumper stickers that viewers will enjoy showing off.

Ultimately, your success is determined by your understanding of the Kickstarter platform and culture and your ability to meet those standards. Furthermore, the quality of your video will help you engage customers and create a more reputable and trusted image for your project.

Once you’ve created your video, it’s important to market it to the right audience to increase the chances of meeting your fundraising goals. Blast it out through social media, email contacts, and much more. Smart outreach is critical to promoting your project and keeping it real.

Be sure to keep your viewers and fans in the loop by providing project updates. This is a great way to thank your backers, share progress, and build momentum for the final outcome.

Resources

Creating a video doesn't have to be complicated. Here are a few resources to help you along the way.

  • New to Video?

    A first timer's guide to
    producing video.

    Get the Book
  • How Much is
    a Video Worth?

    A complete guide to
    calculating the ROI of video.

    Get the Book
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